Monday, 15 May 2017

Gothic Manor pt 6

I'm going to start by saying that the dormer roofs on this build were a huge pain in the arse. Why? Because I chose weird, irregular angles for the roof which meant I had to dip into the long distant past, trying to recall lessons in Mathematics that I probably slept through
Above is a picture of the peak of the bay from the front and the pitch of the roof from the gable end. See, weird, angles. To make a dormer roof for the bays, I had to cut two pieces of wood, with a 35.5° mitre at the top, a 55° angle at the bottom and taper the roof back at a 47° angle for the pitch. Once I wrapped my head around that, and it took a while, I had to find a way to cut all of those angles. That's when things got tricky. The only tool I had available was a chopsaw which can be rotated 45° left and right and tilted 45° left.
I just couldn't work out how I could cut a 35.5° mitre when the saw wouldn't tilt any lower than 45°. Four whole days later it dawned on me. If I made something to lift up the wood I could do it. I made a jig that angled the wood I was cutting to 54.5°. By clamping the wood to the jig and cutting down vertically, in theory the angle I would be left with would be 35.5°


One of the joiners actually had his hand hovering over the emergency stop button for the machines when I cut the wood because he was convinced I would lose a finger or two. Pfft, doubters eh? Obviously I clamped everything down and kept my pinkies as far away from the blade as possible. Chopsaw manicures are not nice 😱

The rest of the angles were much easier to work out and didn't require alcohol or a degree in mathematics.


Above, the pieces cut and glued together. I drew a pencil line inside the roof so that I knew where to cut the opening for the dormers. The middle bay was slightly more complicated in that the dormer had to be cut into two pieces - one part attached to the roof, the other to the bay door. I made a template with card and when I was happy with it, traced the measurements onto the wood.


And finally, all of the roof and dormers glued into place. Phew


Anyone else need a drink after that? Yeah, me too.

41 comments:

  1. would you like ice with that or should we just drink out of the bottle?

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    1. Just a bottle and a straw please Marisa :0D Cheers!

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  2. The miniature is a dangerous activity! But you have succeeded with brilliance
    This window is splendid and the stained glass is resplendent
    You deserved your drink!
    hugs

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    1. Thank you. I'm sure it will be worth it in the end :0) Cheers!

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  3. WELL DONE!!! You are sure spoiling me with all these great posts. I can't wait to see a picture of the front of the house now. This is exciting!!!

    I have no idea what I would have to drink to get there. Some magical brain juice, capable of infusing math in to my ever shrinking grey matter. I'll have a bucket of that please, with a twist. :-)

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    1. Front of the house coming up Catherine and how about a nice Irish coffee? Bit of caffiene for the grey matter, whiskey for the Math :0D

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  4. Good lord, my head nearly exploded just reading that. I'm so excited that you're building something 'different'. I love following your processes (but maybe not when they give me a headache). This is amazing already, can't wait to see what you do with the interior.

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    1. Thanks Alice and sorry about the headache :0/ Maybe a non alcoholic drink for you then? :0P

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    2. Nah, I had some cider and it helped enormously. I really do enjoy your posts!

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  5. Whew, I do need a drink now. Well done, it looks fabulous. :D

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  6. Wow... definitely requires something with alcohol. My brain hurts just reading about it! But it looks wonderful!

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  7. Sea como sea lo has conseguido y con matrícula!!!

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  8. Ahhhh... 90 - 35.5 = 54.5. I get it! You're creative, beautiful, and SMART! I should be jealous but I'm just in awe! Great work!

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    1. Aw thank you Jodi, you're a sweetheart :0)

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  9. Math. Can't escape it!! The dormers look great. And I applaud the accuracy of your cuts!!
    I mini and wine all the time...makes me more accurate...I swear...but no power tools.

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    1. When I was a kid, I always thought geometry was a waste of time and I would never use it again. How little I knew :0D
      I'm convinced drink relaxes the mind and makes you more imaginative. Pass me a bottle :0P

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  10. Whoa. That's most impressive. :D

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  11. This is an amazing and beautiful building. I LOVE watching all the incredible ideas come to be. And so perfectly at that! So inspiring and fun to watch, thanks :)

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  12. Great tutorial and great pictures. Thanks for the post - you deserve your drink! Looking forward to seeing your progress.

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  13. Wow, impressive work, Pepper, well done.......please, for me a good Scottish whiskey: cheers ;O!!
    Thanks for showing this huge job, excellent work!
    Ilona

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    1. You would get on well with my Hubby. He loves Scottish whisky and has quite a collection :0D

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  14. I once spent a jolly half hour with just trying to assemble four bits of something that should have resembled a dormer on a roof once and could not grasp how that could be so difficult, each piece in a different position produced a totally different shape and shoved everything else every which way. Even when sorted there were gaps here there and everywhere, not a snug fir. Now i know why - that cutter hadn't done his maths!!!!!! Half a degree throws everything out massively. Very, very, well done. It is not worth making in card and then seeing what you have afterwards? I do my best not to measure at this scale and use templates for as much stuff as I can. Hate working in 1/16ths and 1/32ths pencil point and brain never seem to match. It all looks wonderful and such a sense of achievement when you put the cap on the bottle! Marilyn

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    1. I totally get what you mean Marilyn. Even after I had cut the dormer and glued it together, I put the square edge on the roof instead of the tapered edge and I honestly stood there thinking I'd cocked it up. It took me ages to site it the right way. Mitred edges are a huge pain when they're even slightly out :0/

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  15. Hello Pepper,
    It is a testament to your skill that you were able to figure it all out and keep your fingers. I repeat, I LOVE this house! Make mine a vodka martini!
    Big hug
    Giac

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    1. Thanks Giac, I always try to keep at least eight of my fingers :0D Vodka Martini coming up :0)

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  16. Guau, es impresionante!!!!, me encantan esos techos. Un trabajo genial.

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    1. Gracias Eloisa. Estoy muy feliz de que te guste :0)

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  17. Pepper, I so admire - and envy - your building skills.😕 You are a whiz of a Wiz, if ever a Wiz there was! (Stolen from the lyrics in 1939 Wizard of Oz) 😉

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    1. Thank you so much Kathy, that's very kind :0)

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  18. Just looking at all the angle math and I'm shuddering! Great job figuring it out! I really like the way the dormer roof detaches from the main building, it looks like a clean cut. It will be neat to see how you add the finishes over it.
    I'm already behind on your posts! Keep them coming! ;)

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    1. Ha, yes. That is going to be the problem. I had two choices - to make the roof in one piece and try to work out how to close it properly or split the roof in two and have problems with the tiles. I'm going to have to disguise that opening as best as I can :0/

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  19. But it has to be champagne, that's it... because it takes champagne to celebrate something extraordinary like this! ;O) And don't forget to pass one glass to the guy on the red knob, also known as the helping hand.

    Hugs
    Birgit

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    1. I think I will keep some Champagne on ice until I am finished. Then I will really celebrate :0D

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  20. You're far braver than I! I can't even tilt the bandsaw bed up at and angle without worrying it's going to fall down and take my fingers off! XD

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