Friday, 5 May 2017

Gothic Manor pt 3

For reasons that I can't explain - brain fart, drinking too much, drinking too little, I made the next part of this project so utterly difficult for myself that the only conclusion I can offer is that I'm an eejit 😃
The very simplest way to build anything onto a door would have been to remove it and then work on it while it was laying down flat. But I chose to struggle with it vertically. Duh! The projection/bay, (Thank you Keli, you smart cookie), is very simple. You add the floors, as an extension from the main building, into the door and then build the walls around it.



It's essential to get both floors in the door and building to meet, if you want to maintain an illusion of one complete floor when the door is closed. I realised without any supporting walls under the second and third floor, the wood bowed ever so slightly downward. So before gluing the bays together, I cut some room height scraps of wood and put them in the building so that the floors were true. Then, after at least a half dozen checks, I glued everything into place.




Do you see the pink paper? That is a very technical bit of kit I hope you realise, which I used to wedge the wood into the gap so that I could free my hands and decide on the height of each window 😄



This is the view from inside with the door shut. As much as I like to see a finished building, I love this part when everything starts to come together. Despite the rough appearance of the plywood, you know that soon it will be transformed with a little plaster, paint and trims.

The middle projection/bay, which I've decided to glue and screw directly onto the right hand door, will house the main entrance and an opening for an oriel window. My mate Charlie, (who was part of the team that built the UK side of the Channel Tunnel, so I trust his judgement), said the piano hinge would easily bare the weight that I'm adding to it as long as I didn't hang the door open for years on end. Duely noted!
This time, I used my noggin for the centre third and built it flat on a table.


Exactly the same principle as the other two doors; cut a peak with steps on either side at the top - routed out the oriel window - used a jigsaw to get the curve in the doorway and glued the sides. This part is slightly shorter and deeper than the other doors so that it stand out from the building. It's amazing how you solve puzzles as you go. I needed to sand the curve in the door since my jigsaw technique was less than satisfactory so I wrapped sandpaper around a tin of paint 😊





Below is a picture of the right hand door glued and with 14 woodscrews to secure it. It's solid. Really solid.


The right hand door closes over the left and hides the opening.



I'm getting there, slowly but surely

Have a great weekend

Pepper :0)



38 comments:

  1. Ooohhh! OMG! That looks so cool. And so nice that you have an in house consultant regarding hinge weight and the doors. I should be working but I'm going to look at your post once more before I knuckle down again.

    So. Cool. :-)

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    1. Thanks Sheila. I am lucky having tradesmen near by to quiz. Don't know if they appreciate the gazzilion questions though :0P

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  2. What a progress... and so nice to have an professional advisor. ;O) Not to forget this clever invention... Pepper's sanding roll! And don't you ever expect me to get sick from new posts from you! *grin*

    Hugs
    Birgit

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    1. Thank you Birgit. Neccessity is the mother of invention :0D

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  3. I'll gladly take all the posts I can get! This is really fun.
    Your progress is impressive considering the amount of time you say you get to work on it every day. I love the way the structure is shaping up. I look forward to the next post, I hope we won't have to wait too long. ;-)

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    1. Thank you Catherine. Although it looks like I'm speeding through the build, these posts are about work I started around August last year :0)

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  4. ¡Qué fachada más bonita está quedando! Si que va a ser un poco pesada pero unas buenas bisagras lo arreglan todo.

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    1. Gracias Isabel. Las bisagras están haciendo su trabajo hasta ahora y esperamos mantener las puertas en su lugar durante muchos años :0)

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  5. Oh, and the middle projection has a different peak. Brilliant.

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  6. It looks amazing! And you're going full force with it. I'm impressed!

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  7. You may call your progress "slow" but it looks like it's moving at a good clip to me, since it has become a real house right before my eyes!

    elizabeth

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    1. Hi Elizabeth. In reality these posts are about work that started last year so yeah, it's slow progress :0P

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  8. Slow progress.....???? OH MY, NO, you're making alot of progress, I like to see this house build! Because it does remind me of the build of my own canal house. This dollhouse has two large doors with hinges and the other wall is, just like the whole house, collapsable. The roof has a large piano hinge and yes, it still works perfect after 15 years. Your collegue is right: if you don't leave the doors open wide for a long time, it works perfect. And I wish I had a collegue, like him, at the time I built this dollhouse hehehe ;). I can't wait to see more of this huge, but beautiful building, Pepper.
    Wishing you a nice weekend.
    Ilona

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    1. Thank you IIona. I hope this build is still standing in 15 years like your canal house :0D

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  9. The result is magnificent! good continuation
    hugs

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  10. I made the same 'obvious' boob on a much smaller scale yesterday - made an MDF chimney breast - three sides glued together and then realised it needed to be cut to the height of the room! Bonkers. Can imagine how you felt! Wonderful work, keep on keeping on.... Marilyn

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    1. You know if I didn't make a mistake somewhere along the line I would think there's something wrong. Maybe the excitement of a new project addles our brains :0D

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  11. Love love love the way the middle section projects out! Had to chuckle at the 14 woodscrews... because we can never be too careful! Plus it's only going to get heavier with the plaster/wood/stone added on.
    I see the piano hinge in their too :) It's actually much slimmer then I was expecting! I'll have to check out the hardware store for them! This is one of the most exciting parts of the build...you can see your plans start to come to life! YAY!

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    1. :0D The joiner actually laughed at how many screws I put in but I'd rather be safe than sorry. Yeah, the piano hinge is only 10mm wide so it fit the 12mm plywood perfectly :0)

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  12. I'm so happy that you started this project! Seeing the progress and the methods is so inspiring! I know it is just going to get better and better as you get farther along into the project, and I will have my popcorn ready! :O)

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    1. Haha, thank you Jodi. You want a drink with your popcorn? :0D

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  13. I'd say you are getting there not so slowly and it looks very good so far. I'm full of admiration. Building a house from start to finish is a brave project to take on.
    Hugs, Drora

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    1. Thank you Drora. I really appreciate the encouragement :0)

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  14. Oh I love watching this come together! So very inspirational and since I love building and tools, I feel like I'm right there with you :)

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    1. Oh man I wish you were here Linda. I would spend weeks, months just absorbing your skills :0)

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  15. Pepper, I love how you're able to put your vision into action. I always have lots of ideas in my head but getting them onto paper and then into actual physical reality never seems to happen. This is such a great project - I can envision it already! - Marilyn D., Oromocto, NB, Canada

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    1. Thank you Marilyn. I can visualise something in 3D, can build it but it doesn't always go smoothly. But I guess that's how I improve my technique - by cocking something up and then doing it again until I get it right :0)

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  16. Hi Pepper! This house is looking really Lovely! I love the look of the bays you have built. There is something so satisfying about doors that open and close! Is the piano hinge screwed into the end grain of the side panels? Or is there a method of attaching it that I don't see? I am still puzzling the business of adding doors to my open back American style houses... I am loving watching this house take shape.... Like you, I love the building process! I am so glad you got to keep the job that comes with the workshop ! ;) I Can't wait for more!

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    1. Hi Betsy. Yes, the piano hinge is screwed into the end grain of the wall. I pre-drilled pilot holes and then screwed in (I think) 4x 1" screws which were longer than the screws that came with the piano hinge. Amazingly, I didn't screw them at an angle and split through the wood in the wall. I can't imagine having an open dollshouse. It must be a nightmare keeping dust out of them :0/

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  17. Waay above my head, but because I know you know I'll accept it! LOL I'll just wait until it is finished then drool over it as I do all of your stuff. LOL

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    1. Aw thanks Grandmommy, that's very sweet :0)

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  18. Hello Pepper,
    The design of the structure is beautiful. Great job, keep up the fantastic work!
    Big hug
    Giac

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    1. Thanks Giac, I really appreciate your lovely comments :0)

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  19. A beautiful project; the house looks perfect.

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