Sunday, 22 February 2015

Still at it Sunday

Since I had nothing finished for 'finish it off Friday', today I'm doing a 'still at it Sunday' post.

The windows are cut and painted, but still need glass. I've watched a dozen You Tube videos on how to hand cut glass but I'm not convinced it's as easy as it looks. Anyone ever had any experience cutting curves in glass? Any tips?



To secure the windows into the wall, (because they're literally floating), I put a 3mm thick piece of scrap material under the window, (the 3mm is the space I need for the glass and back frame)


and then used a bead of builders caulk at the edge of the frame.


It looks like glaziers putty so it works well. I squeezed some caulk into a smaller bottle so that I could control the flow coming out.


to finish I used a modelling stylus thingy to smooth it.
When the caulk was dry, I carefully tipped the whole wall upside down and used a bead of white wood glue to secure the window from the back. 

What else have I done this week? Oh yes, I bought all of the sheet wood I need to finish the room box. I don't own a large table saw so I rely on the local DIY shop and the Joiners where I work to cut everything to size. If you're in the UK, B&Q will cut sheet wood free for the first three cuts and 50pence for anything after that. 

I've come to the conclusion that having a mezzanine floor cutting through two of the windows (on the right hand side of the wall), rather negates the effort I've made with them. So I have decided to have the second floor at the back. The idea is that the mini people living there can appreciate the full length windows and light pouring into the room (imagination running a bit wild here). I'm going to make my own staircase because I can't find anything remotely modern and industrial for sale. I've had a couple of ideas and did a mock-up while waiting for paint to dry.


 The stairs on the right are simple but I'm not sure if they will be strong enough over 8 inches. The stairs to the left are common in industrial interiors.


It's just plastistruct 'H' beam that I've planed flat on one side. I've glued supports every 20mm and the wood steps fit on top of those. I think it will look rather nice painted so that it looks like steel with contrasting wood. Any other ideas?

That's about it except to give a shout about a very cool competition running on Shapeways (please click on the link for details). I'm pretty chuffed to be on the judges panel and hope to see some of your amazing creations. Good luck to anyone entering =0)


Have a fabulous weekend all


Pepper =0)



38 comments:

  1. Hi Pepper! You are Very brave to try to cut real glass in circles!!! I cheated for my Castle windows, by sandwiching the glass pane between two wooden window frames that had the semi-circle top, while the glass in between could have a flat top and two slanted sides, each cut a straight one. The extra glass "corners" are hidden by the wood frame so it looks arched. I am not sure, but I think they make a tool for "scribing" the glass in an arc, but even then, making it break cleanly would take a lot of practice. My Mom made stained glass for a while and she had a glass "grinder" for smoothing edges and it could be used to do some shaping, grinding off the points where the straighter breaks meet. I will look forward to seeing what you do!!! This is a challenging piece for real glass.
    Also, my Dad is an architect with a fondness for unusual stairs... he made one with the steps suspended on the outer end by a steel rods from the ceiling, and the inner end attached to a wall.... like a suspension bridge of sorts! The steel rods function as the railing at the same time, and the space below is completely open.
    I am really enjoying watching this project!!!

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    1. Hello sweets. I thought I would give it a go with glass though I've always used perspex before. Hmm, maybe I could do straight cuts and then use a grinder to finish. I love the idea of the suspended stairs but I think it may be way above my ability. I can't think what I could use for the steel rods either. Man, you've got me thinking now =0)

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  2. Hi Pepper! I absolutely adore this brick wall and the stunning windows, the whole facade is so beautiful! Regarding your question about your problem for cutting the glass for the windows, I have no ready solution, except that you can use Evergreen Scale Models styrene sheets. It is 0,13 mm thin (but there are more sizes in thickness available), you can cut it with an Exacto-knife in curves and although it is very thin, it's strong. And it's clear transparent, has absolutely no deformations and it won't yellowing after years. If you softly tap on the sheet with your nail tip, it even sounds like real glass and you can even 'break' it. If you want to know more about it, I'll add a link here for you:
    http://www.evergreenscalemodels.com/Sheets.htm
    The stairs are superb work, I'm sure the whole project will become gorgeous, as all you do!
    Have a nice weekend too!
    Hugs, Ilona

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    1. Hi IIona, I've always used plastic sheets before but fancied trying glass. I may revert back to the styrene sheet if I can't manage the curves so thank you for the link, it's very helpful =0)

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  3. Hola, me gustan mucho esos ventanales, van a dar mucha luz a la estancia, el exterior precioso y las escaleras cualquiera de las dos son bonitas y parece que aguantarán a los personajes sin problemas.
    Sobre cortar el cristal en redondo, puedes poner reglas de semicírculo del tamaño de las ventanas,y así con el diamante sigues recostada en ese circulo sin torcerte. También puedes hacer tu plantilla en cartón duro copiando la zona curva de la ventana, recortas en el cartón y te sirve de guía...no se si te servirá, sino lo que te ha comentado Llona puede ser una solución.
    Yo estoy buscando un cristal o plástico fino para una puerta que se me ha roto, no encuentro, a veces los mínimos detalles son los más complicados de resolver.
    Un abrazo
    Maite

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    1. Hola Maite , que es una gran idea de utilizar la abertura de la ventana como una plantilla para cortar el vidrio. ¿Por qué no pensé en eso antes de pegar el marco en el ? > _ <
      Creo que puede llegar a ser la hoja de plástico que parece mucho más fácil de hacer. Gracias por sus comentarios y consejos que usted . Muy útil =0)

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  4. Hi there Pepper! I truly love the wall and windows you've put together. They speak to me! I am also looking forward to seeing how you solve the cutting curves in glass problem, willing imitator here! I, like DayDreamer, have used the cheating technique on what I've done so far, three layers, one with square corners to take the glass, the other two masking the squared corners by covering them with circles. Works really well, but I would still like to learn how to cut glass in circles. I have other projects in mind that will require that particular skill! :0) No pressure! Ha.

    I like your alteration to put the second floor to the back of the piece. I think that will create a wonderful sense of openness which completely underscores the intent of your room box, to display your modern miniatures. Looking forward to seeing more!

    Doug

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    1. Hi Doug, you know I wish I had thought this through a little more before deciding on arched windows haha. Seemed so simply at the beginning. I will certainly share any tips if I ever work out how to do it. I'm glad you agree with the second floor. I think I would have regretted putting a floor straight across those windows. You live and learn =0)

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  5. Sigh. Can you move to America--preferably the State of California? LOL :)

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    1. Ha-ha-ha, you know I would come in a heartbeat =0) You know the UK can be quite warm and inviting too - in the summer - the last Saturday of August - for about three hours =0D

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  6. See, you've gone and solved a problem for a real life project. I need to caulk something and those big cumbersome caulking guns don't work well for me. All I need is a middleman bottle. :D

    I love both sets of stairs!

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    1. Well I'm pleased I've solved something haha =0P

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  7. Wow - this leaves me in awe... even glazier's putty. I'm always fascinated of the realism talented people like you can achieve in miniature... and I have no doubt you will solve your glass curving problem soon. Your stairs look stunning and I'm really courious to see more.

    Greetings
    Birgit

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    1. Aw thank you Birgit, that's really kind of you. =0) x

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  8. Could you outsource the glass cutting to your local glass-cutting place?

    And I. too, was going to suggest metal rods embedded into the wall to hold up your stairs. Of course, if you're going to be completely proper, you should check the building code of the area your warehouse will be set in to check what their rules on stair bannisters are: the aswer will probably inform your decision...

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    1. Would you belive that my employers actually run the National Glass Centre in the North East. It's barely two miles from from my desk. I really need to make friends over there and see if I can get some tips. I love those suspended stairs but I think it's beyond me =0/ I can't think what I could use for the rods or how to tie them in either end =0(

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  9. Es asombroso que utilices hasta masilla. Me encanta esa fachada.

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    1. Muchas gracias Isabel . Me alegro de que te gusta lo que he hecho hasta ahora =0)X

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  10. Hello Pepper,
    How wonderful it is looking. I have never used real glass so I'm afraid I have no help to give. The windows are unbelievable and I love your technique for finishing off the edges. I agree that blocking those wonderful windows would be a shame and I love the idea of steel and wood for the steps is just awesome!
    Big hug,
    Giac

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    1. Hi Giac, I was convinced you would have used glass before in your fabulous mansion. I think I may have bitten off more than I can chew here. Yeah, I like the idea of industrial stairs in there =0)

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  11. Hi Pepper! Wonderful scenes here again! Love the way the windows look now!
    I used to do some glassworks: "Tiffany" some years ago. Not anymore. I had a special tool: a cutter. The curves were always difficult, the smaller the curve was, and what type the glass was, how thick or thin... the more careful I had to be. I really can't tell you with my poor English how to make it, I think the videos are the best way to understand the technic. I am sure you can do it!
    :)
    Hugs
    Kikka

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    1. Thank you Kikka. Wow, I bet that was a wonderful skill to have. Well if you think it may be difficult with your experience, I have no chance hahah. Maybe plastic sheet after all =0)

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  12. Oh! I love your wall and windows! Looks awesome! You make a very neat and clear! I'm sorry that I can not tell you how to cut glass!
    I enjoy reading your post!
    Tatiana

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    1. Thank you so much Tatiana. I really appreciate your kind comments =0)

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  13. It really does look beautiful, I love restored industrial buildings so this is right up my tree. Can't wait to see the mezzanine too. Good luck with the glass!

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    1. Thank you Sarah. If I had an infinite amount of money I would buy an old victorian mill and live in it. They're such beautiful buildings =0)

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  14. Again I see your working in mini.. but the shots and quality of the work makes me want to think you are just performing some type of magic trick with a lifesized building....

    The glass insertion will be a wonderful additon to longevity as well. You see alot of issues with plastic versions, you wont need to worry about :)

    I've decided you must bottle this talent... you have and share it with the world..I will be your first customer

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    1. Ha-ha, dammit you've sussed me out. My clever camera tricks didn't fool you =0P Thank you for such a lovely comment jane X

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  15. Woah! And I thought that this was going to be an old-fashioned storehouse...but you really seem to want the mini people feel well in there :-) hence thinking about light coming in and all.
    No technical advice from my side - because I am absolutely confident that you find the BEST solution...

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    1. Hi Marion. Yes, an old building, but the interior will be (hopefully) full of modern style =0)

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  16. Real Glass too!!!!! WOW Pepper! I am so impressed by the details of what you are doing here. The close up of your window also revealed the textures of your brickwork and again, I am blown away by what you have already done. It is these little layers of finesse that make your work head and shoulders above the crowd. The windows look Fabulous and the entire project is moving along by leaps and bounds!

    elizabeth

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    1. Thank you Elizabeth. I've never used glass before but since I've made so much effort with the windows, I wanted to try it...probably one time only. I still haven't worked out how but I'll get there =0)

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  17. The real glass sounds very ambitious! I was also going to say that you could ask a local class cutter to cut the pieces for you. You might try a diamond bit on a Dremel. I love both sets of stairs but I love Daydreamers idea too. I don't think anything is beyond your capabilities!

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    1. Ambitious or stupid ha-ha. I'm giving the stair a go but I've already hit a snag finding in scale metal rods. I will blame Daydreamer if this all goes bottoms-up ;0P

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  18. Gorgeous work, Pepper! Small plastic bottle = great idea! Can't wait to see which stairway you choose. xo Jennifer

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  19. Your windows looks great! Cutting glass sound really scary to me, but I'm afraid of everything, so don't listen to me =) I'm sure you can do it!! (I took the easy way out, using plastic for my windows, plastic from different packings, cheep and easy)
    The stairs looks great, both. Steel and wood sounds great!
    Hannah

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    1. Thank you Hannah. Cutting glass is scary to me too O_O If all else fails I will be using the dependable plastic =0)

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